Zika Is Still An Underfunded Problem

Since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued guidance for travel to the Wynwood in Miami affected by mosquito-borne Zika, a total of 43 such cases have been reported in South Florida (compared to more than 3300 travel-related cases of Zika reported across the United States since January 2015) as of this writing.  There have been no other reported mosquito-borne cases in the 50 U.S. states, but there are over 19,000 mosquito-borne cases in U.S. territories (primarily Puerto Rico).

The latest news on the mosquito-borne virus spread in Florida is mixed.  While the Wynwood neighborhood is no longer considered an area of active virus transmission (it was active from roughly June 15-September 18), Miami Beach is still active (and has been since about July 14).  To be extra cautious, CDC is encouraging those who are pregnant or are partners of pregnant women to avoid unnecessary travel to Miami-Dade County.  Those who may have been exposed to the virus should avoid sex for a minimum of 8 weeks to minimize the chances of either transmitting the disease or increasing the chances of birth defects for any pregnancy following exposure.

Meanwhile, Congress has done little more than posture over passing a funding package for combating the virus.  With the fiscal year officially closing on Friday, any continuing resolution (CR) that is passed (the most likely way the government will stay funded on October 1) would need Zika funding added in order for it to be effective.  I am not optimistic.  The Department of Health and Human Services has done what it can to move money around within existing appropriations, but a CR without Zika language would not provide much relief, as the Department can likely do little more than continuing to cannibalize research on other diseases and viruses.  Regrettably, it seems that with most affected Americans also lacking direct representation in Congress, that Zika will remain something that can be ignored and delayed due to lack of concentrated legislative effort.

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