U.S. And U.K. Team Up On Antibiotic Resistance

On Thursday the U.S. and the U.K. announced a bilateral public-private partnership to address the challenges of antibiotic resistance.  CARB-X (Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator) is a joint effort of the following organizations:

From the U.K.

  • Wellcome Trust
  • AMR Centre

From the U.S.

  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
  • Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency (BARDA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • California Life Sciences Institute
  • MassBio
  • Boston University Law School
  • Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
  • RTI International

The accelerator intends to support at least 20 antibacterial products, with funding for the project coming primarily from BARDA, Wellcome and the AMR Centre.  BARDA has committed to providing $250 million over 5 years, and Wellcome and the AMR Centre will provide additional funds.  NIAID will provide in-kind research and technical support.  Additionally, the private sector partners will provide research and/or business support for projects selected by CARB-X.

There is a two-stage application process for CARB-X support.  Interested projects will need to submit an Expression of Interest form, and if selected, will complete a fuller application process with one of the CARB-X accelerators (Wellcome, AMR Centre, MassBio or the California Life Sciences Institute).  Expressions of Interest are being accepted through the end of October, though it is possible that there will be future funding cycles.

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