‘Secret’ Ebola Treatment And Other Stories

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (formerly known as Ebola hermorrhagic fever) in western Africa is no laughing matter.  The way it’s been inserted into fights over immigration reinforces the need to fight misinformation.  (That one of the politicians concerned that Ebola will come into the U.S. via Central American immigrants is a retired doctor reinforces my belief that not all doctors are scientists.)

Here’s what the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has to say (effective August 6).

“The World Health Organization, in partnership with the Ministries of Health in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria announced a cumulative total of 1711 suspect and confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) and 932 deaths, as of August 4, 2014. Of the 1711 clinical cases, 1070 cases have been laboratory confirmed for Ebola virus infection.”

Contrary to the concerns of several elected officials and media outlets, there is no significant risk of Ebola in the United States.  Two researchers with the disease were evacuated to the United States for treatment at Emory University in Atlanta.  As long as a hospital follows CDC infection control recommendations and can isolate the patient, it can contain the disease.

There is word of a ‘secret serum’ that the U.S. has, but is not currently going to send over to Africa.  This likely refers to the experimental treatment ZMapp, which has not undergone testing on humans.  While it was used in connection with one of the U.S. cases, neither the National Institutes of Health nor the CDC were involved in procuring the experimental treatment or getting it to the infected person in Africa.There are only experimental treatments – not vaccines – in the earliest stages of development in the U.S.  The Food and Drug Administration can allow access to drugs that have not been approved, and is ready to work with manufacturers to make that happen.  But at best, any of the various efforts to develop a treatment and/or vaccine for Ebola will enter the early stage of clinical testing later this year.

In short, this is not so much a gap between demand and the ability to supply as it is a lack of treatments that have been demonstrated safe and effective.  While the pressure exists to have something done, and done soon, the consequences of rushing unproven drugs could prove to be at least as fatal as the disease.

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